Life of Pi :: Yann Martel

I read this book in anticipation of Life of Pi [directed by Ang Lee] the multi-award winning film that, as I’m sure you all know, has been getting both public and critic attention as – stated by the Guardian

The most beautiful film of the year, a technical marvel, and magic realism at its most magical.

To be honest, I can’t really see it as a truly masterful film. Yes, the visual aspect of it is stunning – the realism of it all was quite astounding – however, my verdict of this film is rather similar to the one I had of Avatar. Although the films were a spectacle to be seen, I believe that Avatar had a predictable plot, and that Life of Pi lacked the action to drive the film to the end. What made the film disappointing for me, was the lack of detail, so exquisitely and explicitly written in Martel’s novel. In addition to this, I felt the movie lacked a sense of “forever” that the book captured in terms of the length of Pi’s journey to his inevitable arrival on land.

I guess by now, you can deduce that I enjoyed the novel far better than the film, and so, here are a few of my favourite phrases from the novel.

Quote One :: Life & Death

This is so beautiful. I’ve never seen the relationship between life and death described so…well, beautifully

The reason death sticks so closely to life isn’t biological necessity – it’s envy. Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can.

Quote Two :: Time

I have noticed this happen to me many times – when I lie idle ;)

I did not count the days or the weeks or the months. Time is an illusion that only makes us pant. I survived because I forgot even the very notion of time.

Quote Three :: Freedom

Freedom is a very confusing concept – one that I am trying to come to terms with everyday.

I know zoos are no longer in people’s good graces. Religion faces the same problem. Certain illusions about freedom plague them both.

Quote Four :: Survival

I have a habit of dreaming too much and doing too little. Society tells us to dream but fails to really convey the action that is involved in achieving those dreams (and the hard work!)

Survival had to start with me. In my experience, a castaway’s worst mistake is to hope too much and do too little. Survival starts by paying attention to what is close at hand and immediate. To look out with idle hope is tantamount to dreaming one’s life away.